CONTRIBUTORS

Adel Abdel Ghafar (@dooolism) is a doctoral researcher at the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies (Middle East & Central Asia) at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra, Australia. His dissertation is titled A Political Economy of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and his research involves investigating the social, economic and political roots of the revolution of 2011.

Jalal Abukhater is 17-year old Palestinian resident of Jerusalem. He is a high school senior at the Friends School, will be graduating school in Summer 2012.

Maryam Al-Khawaja (@MARYAMALKHAWAJA) is a 25 year-old Acting president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights and Deputy Director of the Gulf Center for Human Rights. Maryam was recently named one of Foreign Policy‘s Top 100 Global Thinkers 2012. She travels the world to report on violations and meet with politicians to form responses to the situation in Bahrain.

Sultan Al Qassemi (@SultanAlQassemi) is a 33-year-old scholar, columnist, and influential Twitter commentator. TIME magazine says he’s ‘shaping the conversation’ on events unfolding in the Middle East. NPR says he ‘wrote the first draft of Middle East history in short sentences tapped out on his computer and his cell phone.’

Ahmed Al Omran (@ahmed), 28, is a Saudi journalist and blogger. In his work, he focuses on the underreported stories in his country like human rights and free speech. He is @ahmed on Twitter, and he tweets a lot.

Abubakr Al-Shamahi (@abubakrabdullah) was born and raised in Birmingham, UK to Yemeni immigrants in 1989. He is a MA student at SOAS, University of London and a freelance journalist.

Atiaf Alwazir (@WomanfromYemen) is a freelance researcher, blogger and activist based in Sana’a, Yemen. Since the end of January, she has been chronicling the revolution on her blog (http://womanfromyemen.blogspot.com) with commentaries, videos and photographs.

Achref Aouadi a Tunisian “used to be” blogger, a “wanna be” activist and a ” so called” apprentice revolutionary. Achref graduated from streets and the protests of the Tunisian Revolution. In his pastime, Achref enjoys eradicating dictatorship from his nation.

Dina Duella (@Lady_Gabina) is a Libyan-American media professional and currently an Adjunct Faculty member in the Communications Department at Chapman University in Orange, California. Dina holds a Master’s in Communication, Culture, and Technology from Georgetown University, where her research focused on the cultural politics of film and television as well as image and representation in mass media.

Yasmin Haloui (@YasminHaloui), daughter to a Tunisian father and Dutch mother, grew up in Tunisia. At the age of twenty, she went to Holland, where she studied ‘cultural anthropology & development sociology’ and then ‘Conflict Studies & Human Rights.’ She then returned to Tunisia in February 2011 for the brief period of 4 months to do fieldwork for her masters. And since September, she has been back in Tunisia working with grassroots organizations.

Hummingbird, is a Syrian Kurd who works as a translator and a civil journalist. Her goal has been to reach a global audience and raise her voice for Syrians. She was selected by World Pulse – an organization for supporting grassroots women leaders – for a US tour where she presented at Clinton Global Initiative, Mercy Corps, US Department of State and CNN to defend her people’s rights for demanding dignity.

Mattar Ebrahim Mattar (@Matar_Matar) was the youngest MP in Bahrain’s Parliament for Al Wefaq Political Society, the largest political bloc in Bahrain. He represented the largest constituency in Bahrain and was voted to parliament with a majority vote of 85.72% (7689 votes). Al Wefaq parliamentary bloc, including Mr. Mattar, resigned from parliament in protest of the government crackdown on pro-democracy protesters on Feb 17th. Mattar holds a Masters degree in Computer Science specializing in Artificial Intelligence. He is married and a father of two young children.

Omar Offendum (@Offendum) is a Syrian-American Hip-Hop artist, designer, poet & peace activist. He has toured the world to promote his ground-breaking music, been featured on several major international news outlets, helped raise thousands of dollars for various humanitarian relief organizations, lectured at a number of prestigious academic institutions, and most recently been involved in creating several critically-acclaimed songs/poems about the popular democratic uprisings throughout the Middle East & North Africa.

Omar Radi is an independent journalist and militant in a ranges of anti-global movements in Morocco. He is also founding member of the February 20 pro-democracy movement
Dina Sadek is a Cairo based journalist. She worked as a fixer and translator for the Sunday Telegraph and Agence France Presse (AFP) in Egypt and Libya, covering the Egyptian and the Libyan Revolution. She has a degree in English Literature from Ain Shams University.

Dina Sadek (@DinaMSadek) is a DC-based Media Advisor for a non-profit, former Cairo based journalist. She worked as a fixer and translator for the Sunday Telegraph and Agence France Presse(AFP) in Egypt and Libya, covering the Egyptian and the Libyan Revolution. She has a degree in English Literature from Ain Shams University.

Baraa Shaiban is from Sana’a, Yemen and is a Business Administration graduate. He is a Muslim activist, seeking change in Yemen.

Muhammad Radwan (@battutta) is an Egyptian American who graduated from Texas A&M University with an Engineering degree. He has lived in 6 countries, visited over 40, and continues to travel while promoting positivity. One.

Sarah AbdelRahman is an Egyptian video blogger and artist. She recently graduated from the American University in Cairo where she studied Journalism and Theater. Her activism was taken from student- to nation-wide level during the January revolution. She is now dedicated to activism and citizen journalism for a smooth transition to democracy in Egypt.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s